WorldView-3: A State Collaboration

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  • Here, There, Everywhere
    Posted: 08/27/2014

    Although the Museum has been a part of the Denver community for nearly 114 years, we continually grapple with this question: How do we stay relevant in people’s lives? Our city’s demographics are changing, families spend their time and money on a wide variety of activities, and each member of the community values cultural opportunities in their own unique way. What we know for sure is that the Museum is committed to offering experiences that create positive and impactful relationships with our visitors.

  • WorldView-3: A State Collaboration
    Posted: 08/18/2014

    In August, the Denver Museum of Nature & Science hosted some of Colorado’s leading aerospace companies for a live broadcast of the WorldView-3 satellite launch. The event celebrated Colorado’s aerospace heritage. We presented special aerospace-themed activities, including build-your-own Alka-Seltzer water rockets, a panel discussion, and a live launch broadcast.

In August, the Denver Museum of Nature & Science hosted some of Colorado’s leading aerospace companies for a live broadcast of the WorldView-3 satellite launch. The event celebrated Colorado’s aerospace heritage. We presented special aerospace-themed activities, including build-your-own Alka-Seltzer water rockets, a panel discussion, and a live launch broadcast.

 

I particularly enjoyed participating in this event because it showcased the collaborative nature of our state. Five Colorado-based aerospace companies each played a critical role in building and launching WorldView-3, the most sophisticated commercial imaging satellite ever put into orbit. Ball Aerospace, DigitalGlobe, and Exelis developed satellite instruments and imagery systems. A United Launch Alliance Atlas V launch vehicle provided by Lockheed Martin put the satellite into orbit. From start to finish, WorldView-3 was a joint venture.

 

The collaboration spans beyond the scientists who built the 18-foot, super-spectral, high-resolution genius. At the beginning of this year, a federal bipartisan budget deal  included more than $2.7 billion for space projects based in Colorado. This goes to show how much we can accomplish when we work together, and the innovative place our state has become for space exploration and development.

 

The Museum values being the place where these collaborations come together and merge into fun, engaging science programs for our community. Steve Lee, curator of planetary sciences, moderated the panel discussion during the launch. A Broomfield father later thanked Steve and the Museum for organizing these types of events because it gave him and his children a unique educational experience to enjoy together.  As I witnessed our guests enthusiastically calling  “5-4-3-2-1 …” as the rocket boosters lit, I realized  the audience was just as thankful and excited as I was to be a part of this experience.

 

WV3 Launch

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