Denver Museum of Nature & Science Grows Partnership with United Launch Alliance

Denver Museum of Nature & Science Grows Partnership with United Launch Alliance

Funds provide STEM programming and scholarship support for school groups

Denver—March 12, 2013—The Denver Museum of Nature & Science is pleased to announce it will grow its partnership with United Launch Alliance (ULA) for the sixth consecutive year. Headquartered in Centennial, Colo., ULA launches payloads to space aboard its Atlas and Delta rockets, ranging from weather, telecommunications, and national security satellites that protect and improve life on Earth to deep space and interplanetary exploration missions that further our knowledge of the universe.

In addition to providing funding for thousands of students to participate in space science programs both at the Museum and at schools around the state and country, ULA also supports the Museum’s Space Odyssey exhibition and continually partners with the Museum to offer events and viewings of launches involving ULA rockets.

ULA’s increased support will fund these science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs:

  • Scientists in Action: Curiosity Rover Explores Mars—This brand new Scientists in Action program will be the first broadcast of its kind to provide an inside look at an active planetary exploration mission to thousands of students nationwide. Students will have the unique opportunity see and learn about the roles of several mission scientists, engineers, and controllers as they engage, plan, and execute Curiosity’s operations on the Martian surface. 

 

  • Rocket Works—As the engineer, students go full throttle and experiment with the basic principles of flight and motion by designing, creating, and launching their own paper rockets.

 

  • The Great Space Escape—Students leave the confines of a classroom's four walls and become immersed in the night sky in the Museum’s digital portable planetarium. They explore constellations and ancient legends of the sky through new digital images.

 

  • My Night Sky—Activities, such as building a model of the solar system, show students Earth’s place in the universe. They also test rocks to determine which are real meteorites, and dress up like astronauts and practice space exploration skills.

 

  • Art Station Titan—Titan is Saturn's largest moon and one of the most fascinating places in our solar system. Students and teachers learn how to capture their own Titan investigations using scientifically accurate illustrations, just as other great scientists have done throughout history.

“We are thankful for our partnership with United Launch Alliance,” said George Sparks, President and CEO of the Museum. “Their continued support helps us serve more students across the nation and engage them in space science programming.” 

Media Contact

Charlotte Hurley: 303-370-6407, Charlotte.Hurley@dmns.org

About the Denver Museum of Nature & Science
The Denver Museum of Nature & Science is the Rocky Mountain Region’s leading resource for informal science education. A variety of engaging exhibits, discussions and activities help Museum visitors celebrate and understand the natural wonders of Colorado, Earth and the universe. The Museum is located at 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO, 80205. To learn more about the Museum, check www.dmns.org, or call 303-370-6000. Many of the Museum’s educational programs and exhibits are made possible in part by the citizens of the seven-county metro area through the Scientific & Cultural Facilities District.

About United Launch Alliance

Headquartered in Colorado, ULA launches payloads to space aboard its Atlas and Delta rockets, ranging from weather, telecommunications and national security satellites that protect and improve life on Earth to deep space and interplanetary exploration missions that further our knowledge of the universe. With more than a century of experience, ULA is the premier launch service provider for the Department of Defense (DOD), National Reconnaissance Office and NASA. To date, ULA has delivered 68 consecutive, successful missions to orbit.

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