Museum Blog

Articles for author: 34

  • The Southwest Collections or Arthropods Network (SCAN) is a collaborative project to make arthropod collections from ten Southwestern institutions accessible online. It is led by Neil Cobb from Northern Arizona University and involves Frank Krell, Paula Cushing, and Jeff Stephenson from DMNS. The fu…
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  • Publication dates seem to have become meaningless. We could buy books at Christmas 2011 with the publication date 2012. In November 2011 we already received journal issues of February 2012. Presenting us with false publication dates is not only annoying when it comes to determining intellectua…
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  • Scientists often are evaluated by metrics based on citations of scientific papers, because of a common belief that more citations equates higher quality. Is is so? A commonly used metric, the Journal Impact Factor, mainly considers the citations of other scientists' papers. Does this make sens…
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  • During the last six months, the largest specimen from the Snowmass dig, a massive mammoth, was prepared in the insect exhibit area. The insects were boarded up and out of visitors' view. This week, the mammoth moved to the Paleo Lab, and the DMNS Insect exhibit reopened! We used the occupation…
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  • Visit from Guatemala

    Posted 12/02/2011 by Frank Krell | Comments
    From 30 November to 4 December, Enio Cano from Guatemala visited DMNS. He is curator of the arthropod collection of the Universidad del Valle de Guatemala and an expert of bess beetles (Passalidae) and Rutelinae. We invited him with a stipend from the Lloyd David and Carlye Cannon Wattis Found…
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  • How long do dead insects last? Visitors often ask this question when they see our collections containing specimens from the late 1800s. The answer is that they can last hundreds of years or even longer if properly preserved, protected from light, humidity and pest insects. The oldest pinned in…
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  • Many plants rely on animals to disperse their seeds. Animals feed on their fruit and drop the seeds with their feces. Then dung beetles get involved. Particularly in tropical ecosystems, dung beetles are important secondary seed dispersers. Roller beetles relocate them on the horizontally by r…
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  • Four high school students, Samantha Beirne, Isabelle Gunn, Brianne Palmer and Gary Olds, were selected by the DMNS Teen Science Scholar program to work in the Bison Beetle Project. The Scholars help collect samples and mount, label and sort the insect material, preparing it for statistical ana…
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  • Up to a whopping 22 mm in length with bright metallic green coloration, the native Rainbow Scarab, Phanaeus vindex, is the largest and most spectacular of the about 90 dung beetle species inhabiting Colorado. It is rarely seen because it spends its time under cattle and bison dung pats worki…
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  • Jungle Butterflies

    Posted 05/02/2011 by Frank Krell | Comments
    Dr. Dean Fanara, a medical entomologist from Elk, Washington, donated 98 butterflies from the remote jungles of northeast Colombia that he had collected in 1966. Dr. Fanara had conducted research on malaria and Chagas disease for the Pan American Health Organization in the region of Puerto Rey…
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