Fun Facts

Eoraptor was one of the world’s earliest dinosaurs from either hemisphere, living approximately 231 to 228 million years ago. It was relatively small, only three feet long and about 50 pounds.

Nigersaurus had teeth packed in the front of its jaw that were replaced entirely when they wore down. With 50 teeth in each row, each with at least nine replacements waiting in the wings, this dinosaur had hundreds of teeth in its mouth at any given time.

A crested predator, Cryolophosaurus is the first named dinosaur from Antarctica. Scientists had to endure hours of work in temperatures that rarely rose above -20 degrees Fahrenheit—even in Antarctic summer—to recover its fossilized bones.

The most notable physical characteristic of Amargasaurus is its two parallel rows of long spines along its neck. With some reaching nearly 20 inches, its spines were longer than any other known sauropod.

Fossilized remains of Suchomimus were uncovered in the Sahara in 1997. This animal had a long snout like a crocodile that allowed it to catch fish. Its name means “crocodile mimic.”

Related to the famous Velociraptor and a descendant of modern birds, Austroraptor lived 70 million years ago in what is now Patagonia. It likely had feathers, but its very small arms indicate it didn’t actually fly.

Herrerasaurus ischigualastensis is named for the rancher who discovered the first fossil of this carnivore in Argentina.

Masiakasaurus knopfleri, a biped carnivore from Madagascar is named for musician Mark Knopfler because the paleontologists who discovered it were Dire Straits fans.

Carchardontosaurus was first discovered in 1927. Many of the fossils were destroyed in the bombing of Germany during World War II. The cast on exhibit is the only remaining complete skull. 

Location

2001 Colorado Blvd.
Denver, CO 80205
303.370.6000
Directions 

Open Everyday
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

October 6–January 15

Tickets

Ultimate Dinosaurs goes beyond familiar dinosaurs to showcase some of the most spectacular fossils unearthed in recent years. Exhibition is included with Museum admission.

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Fun Facts

The most notable physical characteristic of Amargasaurus is its two parallel rows of long spines along its neck. With some reaching nearly 20 inches, its spines were longer than any other known sauropod. 

Fun Facts

      

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