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Events and Activities

Thursday, May 20
7:45 p.m. (doors open at 7:15)
Phipps Theater
$39.50

The Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe podcast hosts are here in Denver as part of their Extravaganza tour! You may have heard their award-winning science podcast, and perhaps you have read their best-selling book on critical thinking. Now watch them live on stage as they entertain and challenge your perception of reality. Joined by host and musician, George Hrab, the SGU crew will create a skeptical extravaganza of special significance!

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Thursday, December 3
7 p.m. 
Virtual Event
Free

 

Christian Cooper.  John Muir.  George Floyd.  What does race have to do with it? In the compelling book "Black Faces, White Spaces", Carolyn Finney explores why African Americans are so underrepresented when it comes to interest in nature, outdoor recreation, and environmentalism. Finney argues that the legacies of slavery, Jim Crow, and racial violence have shaped cultural understandings of the “great outdoors” and determined who should and can have access to natural spaces. As a National Parks Advisory Board member from 2010 to 2018 and a scholar-in-residence at the Franklin Environmental Center at Middlebury College, Finney is at the forefront of a movement to understand how people negotiate their relationship to the environment. During this evening of impactful discussion, Finney will address how art, science, and popular culture create frameworks for engagement among individuals, communities, and organizations to nurture healthy relationships between humans and the environment.

This program is presented in partnership with Bird Conservancy of the Rockies with promotional support from Denver Audubon and Audubon Rockies. This event is free for Bird Conservancy of the Rockies and Audubon members with the promotional code.

 

 
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Wednesday, Oct. 7
7-8 p.m.
Virtual Event
Free members, $8 nonmembers
From the Atacama to the Sahara and from Namibia to Nevada, explore the hills, valleys, and dunes of deserts with Geologist Bob Raynolds and Ka Chun Yu, curator of space science. Marked by little precipitation and extreme conditions, deserts can be extremely harsh, but are also some of the most striking and beautiful places on Earth. 
Image credit NASA



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Friday, September 18
11 a.m. MDT
Virtual Event
Free 

Join Smithsonian Affiliations and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute's Global Health Program to explore our current global health crisis and the ways in which the health of humans, animals, and the environment are inextricably linked. Dr. Maureen Kamau is a Smithsonian veterinary research fellow with the Global Health Program, and is based at the Mpala Research Center in Laikipia, Kenya. Through her fellowship, she participates in clinical care of Kenya’s native wildlife and conducts various research projects in wildlife population health and conservation. Dr. Kamau will share her experiences following this unique career path, how her research in Kenya relates to current concerns around infectious disease and pandemics, and how her careful study of poop has been instrumental in working to save the Eastern Black Rhino.

 

This presentation is a Smithsonian Affiliations Virtual Scholar Talk.

 

 

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Tuesday, September 29
4 p.m. MDT
Virtual Event
Free 

The transportation sector has rapidly become one of Colorado’s leading sources of carbon emissions in recent years, accounting for nearly a quarter of all its greenhouse gases. In 2018, the state released its first-ever electric vehicle plan, outlining its goals for building out infrastructure, boosting consumer demand, and accelerating the transition to a zero-emission fleet. Meanwhile, Colorado research labs have continued their work on next-gen EV batteries and rapid charging technologies. But ongoing challenges remain due to lingering questions over cost, range, battery life, and charging station availability – not to mention the economic impact of COVID-19. So what lies ahead for electric vehicles in terms of development and widespread implementation?

Join us for the premiere episode of our Future of Energy series on Tuesday, Sept. 29 from 4-5 p.m. Mountain Time as we discuss EVs with Michael King, Assistant Director of Electrification & Energy for the Colorado Department of Transportation, and Jason Quinn, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Colorado State University. They’ll discuss recent electric vehicle research developments as well as the path forward for Colorado as it pursues its electrification goals. Viewers are invited to submit questions to the panelists in advance for the moderated Q&A discussion.

This free public webinar is a presentation of the Institute for Science & Policy and the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. The session will also be streamed on Facebook Live.

 

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Thursday, October 1
8 p.m.
Virtual Event
Free
Adults Only

Registration Opens Soon!

What does the nose know? Take an olfactory trip with scent artists and scientists to inhale the facts and fictions of your sense of smell,  take a trip to space and sniff around, delve into the fascinating world of the politics of scent, and learn some interesting hacks that might just sweeten up your surroundings.

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Thursday, October 29
8 p.m.
Virtual Event
Free
Adults Only

Registration Opens Soon!

Grab your mug of tea or a pumpkin spice latte and cozy up for a journey to autumnal otherworlds. Commune with animals, hear from Dr. Erin Baxter, acting curator of anthropology, and feel the pull of the moon while getting familiar with the way ancient people around the world celebrated the turning of the seasons.  

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Thursday, November 19
8 p.m.
Virtual Event
Free
Adults Only

Registration Opens Soon!

Delve into the metaphorical matrix and coding for good.  Immerse yourself in multiple realities while discovering the science behind the synthesized. 

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Thursdays, Sept. 24, Oct. 1, Oct. 8, Oct. 15, & Oct. 22
5 p.m. MDT
Virtual Event
Free 

After a nearly 80-year absence, gray wolves appear to be on the verge of returning to Colorado. In July 2019, a lone radio-collared wolf became the state’s first confirmed Canis lupus sighting in the wild in years. Then, in January, a separate pack appeared in Moffat County in northwest Colorado. This November, voters will go to the polls to determine the fate of Ballot Proposition 114 which, if passed, would charge the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission with formally reintroducing wolves no later than 2023.

The potential return of this charismatic and controversial species has sparked a wide range of passionate reactions. Some Coloradans praise the restoration of an endangered apex predator to its ancestral range while pointing to the associated ecosystem benefits. Others are wary of the economic impact on agriculture and the challenges of adding wolves to the increasingly populated Western Slope. For generations, wolves and humans have navigated a fraught dynamic of coexistence. So what does the science tell us about the pros and cons of wolves returning to our backyard? And, if wolves are in Colorado’s future, how can society have an effective dialogue that uses science to inform policy and management?

In this special four-part webinar series, we’ll explore wolf reintroduction through the lens of science, policy, and lived experiences. Our diverse group of panelists will discuss the current state of wolf populations, dive into the data about the species’ role in the ecosystem, talk trade-offs, and hear firsthand stories from those who’ve already been living amongst wolves in other parts of the U.S.

The Science of Restoring Wolves to Colorado
Thursday, Sept. 24 at 5 p.m. MT 

Media Coverage and Public Perception of Wolves
Thursday, Oct. 1 at 5 p.m. MT

Community Perspectives and Conflict over Wolves
Thursday, Oct. 8 at 5 p.m. MT

The Values and Costs of Wolves
Thursday, Oct. 15 at 5 p.m. MT

The Experience of Living with Wolves
Thursday, Oct. 22 at 5 p.m. MT

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Wednesday, Sept. 30
7-8 p.m.
Virtual Event
FREE
Go “behind the stories” with space scientists Ka Chun Yu and Naomi Pequette as they use the best images and animation available to help understand new developments.

Please find the Zoom link in your email confirmation upon registering.

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Wednesday, Sept. 23
7-8 p.m.
Virtual Event
Free members, $8 nonmembers
Dr. Alan Titus, Paria District Paleontologist for the Bureau of Land Management, will discuss the investigation at the scene of the only known mass death of tyrannosaur dinosaurs in the southern U.S. Using standard geological methods combined with state-of-the-art mass-spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, the secrets of this 76.4 million-year-old mystery begin to be revealed, possibly pointing to more complex social behavior among southern tyrannosaurs than previously thought.

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Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021
7-8 p.m.
Virtual Event
Free members, $8 nonmembers
Prepare for a trip to Himalayan glaciers, chilly fjords, and the frigid coast of Antarctica. Geologist Bob Raynolds and Ka Chun Yu, curator of space science, will guide you through landscapes defined by snow and ice, which are also increasingly affected by rising global temperatures. Image credit NASA.



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Tuesdays & Thursdays, October 27-November 5

6-9 p.m.

$255 member, $225 nonmember 

 

Beetles comprise the largest group of animals on Earth, and new species are discovered on a daily basis. Marjorie Leggitt, an award-winning science artist, will guide you through the process of illustrating an anatomically accurate, textural beetle in vivid color. You choose the medium, watercolor or colored pencil. This all-levels workshop begins with an overview by Dr. Frank Krell, curator of entomology. Learn about the fascinating order of Coleoptera, a beetle’s anatomy and lifecycle, and the diverse roles of beetles as tormentor or benefactor. Select a beetle to illustrate from the Museum’s vast teaching collection. Follow Leggitt as she defines the steps to producing an accurate pencil drawing and shows you how to mimic texture intricacy and develop color luminescence. You’ll end up with a beautiful beetle portrait to take home and frame. During the first session, materials will be provided by the Museum and additional materials for students to bring will be discussed.

All sales are final unless the Museum cancels the event.    

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September 21 – October 16
2 p.m. – 5 p.m.
Weekly camps, Monday – Friday
Grades K – 5

After School Camps get brains and bodies moving after a day of remote learning! Campers will learn and play as they experiment, create, build, and ask questions while developing a passion for science in sessions led by experienced educators. 

Online enrollment for after school camps is openScholarship registration is by phone only, call Guest Services at 303.370.6000, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.

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SOLD OUT

SOLD-OUT

Tuesday, October 13 • 6–9 p.m.
Tickets required
$8 adult member, $6 senior/youth member

Have you ever wondered to yourself what your dog is thinking? "Dogs! A Science Tail" is a fun, interactive glimpse into the world of our canine friends. The exhibition highlights the extraordinary ways dogs see, hear, and smell their surroundings and explores why humans and dogs are best friends.

No walk-up tickets will be available; events subject to selling out. Exhibition entry by timed ticket only due to gallery capacity.

An optional prepurchased dinner is available for an additional charge:
$14 adult/senior/junior
$9 child

Menu
New Mexico style red chili chicken enchiladas, borracho beans, ancho fried rice
Sub roasted vegetables for vegetarian option
Child option: bean and cheese quesadilla, ancho refried rice, street corn on the cob
Dessert - chocolate peanut butter layered cake
Dinner reservations due by September 29.
Please call Guest Services at 303.370.6306 to add dinner to your evening.

COVID-19 Health & Safety
We know you have questions about what to expect when you come back to your Museum as your family’s safety is our top priority. Our promise to you is an unwavering commitment to safe spaces for all who visit the Museum – we invite you to learn more here.

All rights reserved. Used under authorization.

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Captioned Videos

SOLD OUT

Thursday, September 24 • 6–9 p.m.
Tickets required
$8 adult/senior member

Have you ever wondered to yourself what your dog is thinking? "Dogs! A Science Tail" is a fun, interactive glimpse into the world of our canine friends. The exhibition highlights the extraordinary ways dogs see, hear, and smell their surroundings and explores why humans and dogs are best friends.

No walk-up tickets will be available; events subject to selling out. Exhibition entry by timed ticket only due to gallery capacity.

An optional prepurchased dinner is available for an additional charge:
$25 adult/senior member
Menu
Pan seared pollock with chow mein noodles, soy-ginger butter, crispy vegetables and wakame
Sub tofu and shitake mushrooms for vegetarian option
Dessert - chocolate peanut butter layered cake
Dinner reservations due by September 10.
Please call Guest Services at 303.370.6306 to add dinner to your evening.

COVID-19 Health & Safety
We know you have questions about what to expect when you come back to your Museum as your family’s safety is our top priority. Our promise to you is an unwavering commitment to safe spaces for all who visit the Museum – we invite you to learn more here.

All rights reserved. Used under authorization.

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Friday, January 17–October 30, 2020
Museum open until 9 p.m.

Can't make it to the Museum during the day? Come for an evening visit during Friday Evening Hours! The Museum will be open until 9 p.m. on Fridays until October 30. Admission prices remain the same and, as always, admission is free for our members. Explore the wonder of "The Art of the Brick" and discover the dynamic relationship between dog and man in our newest temporary exhibition "Dogs! A Science Tail", opening August 14. We look forward to kicking off the weekend with you.

Guests are strongly encouraged to purchase tickets in advance online where they will receive a special $1 discount per ticket. Members are encouraged to obtain their free admission ticket online, too.  

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