Dinosaurs of Antarctica 3D

Dinosaurs of Antarctica 3D

Now Showing

Dinosaurs of Antarctica will introduce audiences to the amazing and bizarre prehistoric creatures that inhabited Antarctic forests and swamps hundreds of millions of years ago. The film follows a team of paleoecologists on a quest to understand the southern continent’s profound transformation, from a warm and bio-diverse Mesozoic to the frozen desert we know today.



7 Reasons to Watch Dinosaurs of Antarctica

Joe Sertich, PhD, Associate Curator of Dinosaurs

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NOT ALWAYS ICY
Did you know Antarctica was not always covered in ice and was once home to bizarre early dinosaurs and their relatives? Learn about dinosaurs you may have never heard of, like Cryolophosaurus and Glacialisaurus.

CRAZY MONTHS OF DARKNESS
Discover ancient climates and learn how ancient animals managed to survive in extremes on the southern pole! Even though it was ice-free, the plants and animals of ancient Antarctica still had to contend with crazy day and night cycles throughout the year, with three months of nearly complete darkness and three months of nearly complete daylight.

FAN-LIKE CRESTS
The meat-eating Cryolophosaurus had a strange, fan-like crest on its forehead. We think these may have been displays to attract mates or signal to their friends, much like the bizarre crests on birds today. In this film, you will get to see how a Cryolophosaurus may have used its crest to attract attention!

AMPHIBIANS RULED!
Learn about the predators that lurked in the freshwater streams and rivers of Antarctica. The climate was too extreme to support more familiar aquatic predators like crocodiles, so giant amphibians took their place.

MOUNTAINS IN ANTARCTICA
Antarctica is not entirely covered in ice as most people would think. There are actually mountains crossing the interior of the continent, which expose rocks from the early time of dinosaurs, and the coasts preserve some of the last Cretaceous dinosaur ecosystems from the edge of the world. You’ll get to see these in the film.

ANTARCTICA & PANGAEA
Fossils collected from some of the earliest Antarctica expeditions were some of the first used to demonstrate that the continents were once linked into a vast supercontinent, Pangaea. Colorado was much farther south than it is today, near the western coast of Pangaea.

NOT MUCH MOVEMENT
Antarctica has not moved much over the past 250 million years. The southern continent has been on the bottom of the globe ever since it was part of Pangaea. This is still being studied by geologists. Antarctica currently has about 5.483 million square miles and a seasonal human population of 1,000 to 5,000.

BUY TICKETS | PHOTOS: DR. JOE SERTICH IN ANTARCTICA

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